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Trump, Brexit and the Norns

Posted by Kevin on April 2, 2017

2016 is likely to prove a pivotal year in contemporary history. Two major votes saw the US election of President Trump and the UK exit from the European Union. It was a right-wing populist swing for UKUSA – and I called both votes wrong. I expected both to be close, but the other way round. […]

Trumpton Tower: a modern slapstick

Posted by Kevin on March 18, 2017

In true slapstick style, Trump sticks it to GCHQ, and GCHQ slaps down Trump. All over what did or did not happen in Trumpton Tower. Background On 4 March, the realDonaldTrump tweeted an accusation that former President Obama had wiretapped Trump Tower during the run up to the election. Is it legal for a sitting […]

Smoking guns and glass houses in Russia Vs Clinton

Posted by Kevin on January 7, 2017

In the ongoing saga of Russia Vs Clinton, a declassified version of the US Intelligence Community assessment of Russian involvement in the 2016 US election has now been published. But if you hoped for a smoking gun, dream on. The document states very clearly that it is primarily the agencies’ conclusions; any actual proof has […]

Living the Nightmare

Posted by Kevin on November 20, 2016

This is the stuff of nightmares. It is a nightmare set in a shadowy world of total government surveillance, where government can spy on anyone pretty much unhindered (IP Bill), and where citizens’ personal data can be given by government to pretty much anyone (Digital Economy Bill). In this shadowy world there is a government […]

Free and open internet

Posted by Kevin on November 18, 2016

I think I’ve slipped into a parallel universe where contradictions prove themselves. How else do you understand the NCSC, part of GCHQ, one of the Five Eyes, making this tweet: This was the very day that the IP Bill effectively became law. It was passed without amendment by the House of Lords meaning that there […]

Secondary legislation and the role of the House of Lords

Posted by Kevin on November 17, 2016

Secondary legislation is an abomination. It allows the government – usually just the relevant Secretary of State – to alter, amend and expand an existing law without any reference to Parliament. It is described as a necessary means for ensuring laws remain relevant and pertinent to our fast-moving society. In reality, it is simply a […]

The IOC effect?

Posted by Rob Slade on August 13, 2016

The Streisand effect is well known in online circles. If you attempt to hide or censor something, you inevitably draw attention to it. The International Olympic Committee seems to have discovered, or created, a new law. The IOC has, in an attempt to control publicity and boost attention for it’s media “partners”/sponsors, banned all video […]

#panamapapers and Mossack Fonseca’s Reckless, Feckless IT Security: Was That Breach a Privacy Curse or a Transparency Blessing?

Posted by Richard Smith on April 9, 2016

…the tight-lipped Mossack Fonseca (believed to be an industry leader) The Economist, 2012 Readers will doubtless have noticed that someone has recently loosened Mossack Fonseca’s lips, quite a lot, by way of an utterly monumental hack. 2.6TB of business emails and documents, covering the affairs of Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca’s sometimes rich and politically exposed, sometimes […]

Out for a duct: is there a flaw in fibre to the home strategy?

Posted by Monica Horten on March 21, 2016

Is fibre to the premises based on a false premise?  The UK telecoms regulator, Ofcom, is proposing a strategic shift to fibre optic networks to carry our broadband services. A key plank of the strategy is that British Telecom (BT ) should open up its ducts to competitive broadband providers in order to get fibre […]

Static on the line means uncertainty for broadband industry in wake of Ofcom review

Posted by Monica Horten on March 10, 2016

As the UK regulator, Ofcom, wags its finger at BT, the UK broadband industry remains in a state of uncertainty. What prospect is there for a strategic leap to super-fast broadband as a national ‘right’? Share This: